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tonight. we have madness in the middle east. i know you're used to that but we have massacres in syria and riots in egypt. we'll one of the top experts in the country on that. >> i have decided to declare a state of emergency in in the provinces. [ yelling ] >> cenk: and then the great grandson of elron hubbard comes back on the show. i want to ask him what does scientology have in store for some of the celebrities like katie holmes and what is it like to live in a family so scared by scientology. >> it was a subject we never talked about at the kids table of the family reunion, but he was my great grandfather. l. ron hubbard. >> cenk: an then did you know that the nfl is a non-profit? wait until you find out how much they're paying their current ceo and past ceo when they're not paying any taxes. great story, great show. go time. [ ♪ theme music ♪ ] >> cenk: all right, welcome to "the young turks." so now we've got a lot of trouble in the middle east. for example in syria we have yet normas kerr. this one in alepo. at least 65 bodies found by a riverbed up to as many as 80 now peo
laws. he thanked russia and china for their support of syria and stressed that his country would defend itself against outside forces. the last time the syrian president addressed was in 2012. this comes to was courtesy of aljazeera english. -- comes to us. >> and this is the first time since november that the president has given a public address in his own country. [crowd chanting] not so long after, it was said that maybe as many as 60,000 people have lost their lives in during the course of the 21- month conflict. while our translators are standing by to bring you -- president bashar al assad, live in the syrian capital. >> [speaking foreign language] >> members of the government, heads, and members of peoples, organizations, ladies and gentlemen. but today, i look at your faces and the faces of people of my country with sadness and pain. i look at the eyes of the children of syria, and i do not see an innocent smile on their faces. i look at the hands of the elderly and see them praying for their children, daughters and grandchildren. today, pain and suffering is spread all over syr
>> russia condemns an israeli air strike in syria. what started it. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> you are watching al jazeera live from doha. china takes extreme measures to tackle its pollution problem. and we visit the bright lights of macau where investors are raking it in. russia is condemning an israeli air strike on syrian territory calls link -- calling it a brazen attack on international law. what is unclear is what israel was targeting. israeli warplanes attacked a convoy of trucks traveling across the border of lebanon. nicole johnson is live in jerusalem. the reaction is coming in from this incident. >> that is right. we have had a response from hezbollah. it has condemned the attack inside syria, saying it is a dangerous act. we also heard from russia, which said it will be taking urgent action to clarify what has happened. there is still a great deal of uncertainty. the u.s. navy is reports in israeli officials spoke to u.s. a administration officials and informs them they are planning and carrying out an attack on an arms sh
>> this is the "journal" on dw in berlin. >> our top stories at this hour -- syria says it has the right to defend itself following an israeli air strike right over its territory. >> a shock for a german banking giant as it post more than 2 billion euros in quarterly losses. >> and tornadoes batter six u.s. states in the southeast of the country. >> syria has summoned the head of the united nations mission in israeli-occupied territory. the issue is an israeli air raid on what syrian officials say was a military research center near damascus. >> the arab league has also condemned the strike, but the actual target is still not exactly clear. some reports suggest a weapons convoy believe to be carrying russian-made anti-aircraft missiles from syria into lebanon. >> we will speak to an expert on the region later. first, this report. >> the israeli government has not issued any statement, but national papers are full of the news. u.s. officials say the raid targeted a weapons convoy headed for members of hezbollah, an ally of the syrian president. but the syrian government denied t
think russia and china for their support of syria and stressed that his country would defend themselves from outside forces. the last time he addressed the nation was in june 2012. coverage comes to us courtesy of al-ajzeera english. -- al- jazeera english. >> this is the first time since november that the president has given a public address in his own country. official figures in united nations said as many as 60,000 people have lost their lives during the course of the 21 month conflict. [chanting] our translator is standing by [applause] -- by. [applause] president bashar al-assad, live from the syrian capital. >> ladies and gentlemen, today i look at your faces and the faces of the people of my country with sadness and pain. i look at the eyes of the children of syria. i'd look at the hands of the elderly today, pain and suffering is spread all over syria. safety and security are absent in these streets. many women lost their children, many children became orphans. siblings have been divided. this pain is spread over the country. from the pain, hope is born. from difficulty, soluti
." >> this is "bbc world news america." the war and syria spills over after israeli jets strike syrian territory. damascus that threatens to retaliate. playing defense, president obama's choice to lead the pentagon gets a grilling from his former colleagues. >> to my reference to the surge -- >> were you right or wrong? lts out america's national anthem to prove she has the pipes to do it live. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. tonight, syria and iran are threatening to retaliate for an israeli air strike inside of syrian territory. the attack took place in the early hours of wednesday morning outside of damascus. the target was believed to be a convoy carrying anti-aircraft weapons bound for hezbollah. we have reports on how this could further inflame the region. >> the explosions are recorded by steering activists seem more powerful than anything the rebels could do. there is a different account of pensh the government saidhat planes bombed a military research center between damascus and the lebanese border. they said two people were killed in the rai
to have to think hard about other places like syria. >> right. >> where there's, you know, a massive loss of life, 60,000 already. and we're hanging back there. again, i think out of reluctance to get too involved because of the slippery slope that in the end will have to be militarily involved and the people and the president have better things to do. >> a piece in "the wall street journal" this week saying basically there's too much reaction to iraq and inaction here he compares to the first president bush not doing anything about the shiite uprising in iraq in 1991, which he argued led ultimately to the second gulf war. i think that may be an area where people would debate, but what are the consequences of the u.s. hanging back in syria? >> well, if we hang back in syria, there could be a dissent into chaos. it's already headed in that direction. again, the rise of these islamic jihadist groups, they're actually in the lead in the fighting against the syrian regime. and of course we've got chemical weapons there that could well get into the hands of these jihadist groups. so there's a
it live. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. tonight, syria and iran are threatening to retaliate for an israeli air strike inside of syrian territory. the attack took place in the early hours of wednesday morning outside of damascus. the target was believed to be a convoy carrying anti-aircraft weapons bound for hezbollah. we have reports on how this could further inflame the region. >> the explosions are recorded by steering activists seem more powerful than anything the rebels could do. there is a different account of what happens. the government said that planes bombed a military research center between damascus and the lebanese border. they said two people were killed in the raid. u.s. officials say that jets bomb a convoy carrying anti aircraft missiles. >> you will not allow and we will prevent any attacks for hezbollah to smuggle such weapons from syria. is israel attacks, it means that such an attempt by hezbollah was made. >> the contagion from the violence in syria worries the whole region. syria sits on the middle east religious an
, that is not the top story. the top story is more evidence of the violence in syria that has reached unprecedented levels according to the u.n. envoy. our correspondent has more on this. >> how can you guarantee that innocent men, women, and children will not get killed? >> there were bombs on the edge of rebel control. >> shell says they're happy after being cleared in a dutch court of massive oil spills in nigeria. campaigners say that they will fight on. shot by the taliban, she is recovering well after another operation on her face. also in the program, aaron has the business news. blackberry is fighting back today? >> it does not get bigger than this. it is make or break for the company behind blackberry. today they unveil this beauty. for the company that has lost 90% of its value in the last few years, is this enough to turn around the fortunes? >> is 12 noon in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington, 2:00 in the afternoon in syria. government forces operating on an unprecedented action. rebels are also fighting back with evidence of how -- with evidence uncovered by the bbc. they are constructing
>> rose: welcome to the program. tonight clarissa ward of cbs news, she has been inside syria, reporting from inside syria. >> on the issue of our policy towards syria, what sometimes seemed unclear to me is what is our syria policy. what is the u.s.'s policy. because at the moment it's sort of looks like a kind of nonpolicy in a sense. i mean it's clear that the u.s. supports or does not support and condemns bashar al-assad but they're also not helping the rebels. >> rose: we conclude with a look at two recent elections in the middle east, one in jordan and one in israel. we talk with jordan's ambassador to the united nations prince bin ra'ad and efraim halevy. >> when we first heard the rumblings of the arab spring some may have thought that thises with a train that was passing through the station in and out. i think his majesty understood full well that these were seismic rumblings. and the region has had for a long time been bereft of real reforms. his majesty began earlier on. and i think you know now felt that for those who had a vested interest in the stat usco, this is
of high-end knit wear. now to syria where president bashar al assad made a rare speech and was in rare form today as he blasted the opposition and defiantly resisted international calls for him to step down. cnn's mohammed jamjun joins us from syria. this was his first speech since june. what was his message? >> his message was similar. as rare as that has been in the past whenever he has spoken. he remains entrenched, defiant. he defied international calls for him to step down. he blamed what was happening in syria as a foreign conspiracy. called the opposition terrorists and traitors, and denied there was a revolution going on in syria. said it wasn't a fight between the government and the opposition, but rather a fight between sir yarks the holeland and its enemy. and here's what he had to say about that point. >> translator: this is a conflict between authority and power or between the enemies of the homeland. this is a conflict between those who wanted to take revenge against the people. to fragment syria. those are the enemies of the people. and the enemies of god. and the enemie
>> but his proposal has been greeted with scorn by the opposition in syria and abroad. hello, this is al jazeera live from london. also coming up -- at least 16 people are killed in a u.s. drone strike in northern pakistan. tension over the indian flag continues in northern ireland as streets prepare for more protests. and as orthodox christians celebrate christmas, we speak to the egyptian pope. the international community has been quick to condemn syrian president bashar al assad's plan for peace in war-torn countries. the first speech called "beyond hypocritical." addressing supporters, described the opposition as terrorists and slaves of foreign power. he went on to support the national dialogue to end the 21-no conflict. assad these talks could create a national charter on syria's future, which he put to a referendum. while the opposition dismissed the proposals saying they're aimed at wrecking current diplomatic efforts. we frort amman's neighboring jordan. in an opera house in central damascus, packed with cheering supporters, the syrian president gave his first speec
. >> rose: change in syria, israel and jordan when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following. >>> a polar bear cub is born with no sense of sight. we are a decisional funding provided by these funders. >> and by bloomberg a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. from our studios in new york city this is dharl charlie rose. >> the arab spring reached syria nearly two years ago when residents of a small southern city protested the government's tover ture of students. today those protests erupted into one of the post deadly civil yars in syrian history. over 400,000 refugees have fled the war-torn country, opposition remains fragmented and in some cases disorganized but as the violence escalates, the international community may have to decide when and how to intervene am joining me cbs news correspondent clarissa ward. she has spent much of the past year reporting from inside sirria. she is one of the only journalists to tell this story from the front lines. i am pleased to have her here become on this program and to congratulate her bec
in syria is more complicated after israeli warplanes struck a military target inside of syrian territory. there are conflicting reports about what it was. and military research facility was hit, but that has been disputed. there has been no official confirmation from israel. i spoke to the chief international correspondent a few moments ago. what can you tell us about what was hit? >> we had two different accounts. we had reports that israeli jets for the first time had bombed a convoy of weapons heading from syria towards lebanon to support hezbollah. hezbollah has been expressing its concern in recent days and it sent its military intelligence chief to washington where he will express concern about chemical weapons from syria of going into the hands of hezbollah. on the nighttime news, they were taking satisfaction in the fact there had not been any verbal response from damascus or hezbollah. no physical response as well. syria came out with their own version of offense which was there was no convoy but they had bombed a scientific research center close to damascus and it used a rather
on in syria. israelis are lining up to receive gas masks as fears of retaliation rise. the french government says its intervention in mali is a success after the rebels are driven out of their last stronghold. as beijing worse -- experiences the worst pollution in years, we will be reporting from china's capital of coal. how do you feel growth without wrecking the environment? >> increasingly, it is coming at a huge cost. >> also in the program, we look at what is happening in the world of business. yet another strike in greece. >> the greek tragedy continues as the country comes to a standstill in a massive strike just days after the greek finance minister tells us things are looking good. this is the last year of recession, he said. the problem is that nobody seems to have told that to the millions of greek's on the ground -- greeks on the ground. it is midday in london, 2 p.m. in damascus, where syria has accused israel of carrying out an airstrike in its territory. there has been a reaction from bashar al-assad's allies in moscow. the foreign ministry there has condemn the attack. there
to the syria border and some into the iranian border, and my sisters and brothers who served in that war see now this sunnies of iraq siding with the shiites of iran, and the same in damascus and what's happening there, and i see beirut veteran seeing the same thing happening all over again, but in a different geographical area, and it's basically, from my intelligence, what i saw, i did 30 years in the military, retired and disabled right now. i see the political hedging against the military side, and i know for a fact that these weapons of mass destruction irregardless of what the marines that went over and did the investigation said. >> host: mr. gordon. >> guest: well, the caller has a good point, and the reason the issue of weapons of mass destruction is complicated is because saddam had the weapons. no doubt. he used them against the kurds and had them in desert storm campaign that the caller participated in. he had chemical weapons, scud missile, and i was there then. he fired them at saudi arabia and israel. he had bilogical weapons and makings of a nuclear realms program, and, in fa
and the religion of syria's president assad. if he is overthrown, will all alawites become targets? >>> and bob faw on what some catholic school systems are doing to try to survive? >> our educational system was imploding. enrollment-wise, finance wise, something radical, radical surgery had to be done. >> announcer: major funding for "religion & ethics news weekly" is dedicated to i founder's interest in religion, community development and education. additional funding also provided by mutual of america, designing customized individual group and retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. the january henson foundation, and the corporation for public broadcasting. >>> welcome, i'm bob abernethy. it's good to have you with us. arguments continue over the so-called "fiscal cliff" deal approved this week in the fina minutes of the 112th congress. and religious groups are among those weighing in. the family research council criticized the deal for not including spending cuts and entitlement reforms. meanwhile, leaders of the christian group bread for the world said while the measure
by the u.s., fighters are gaining support in syria. we have an exclusive report. entering a russian treasure trove inside of this museum, this collection is like no other. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. uncertainty tonight around the fate of dozens of hostages held by islamists in algeria. they launched a raid to try to free the hostages and the bbc understands there are several casualties. >> algerian forces surrounding a gas plant according to of algerian television. some hostages are dead, someone did, some are free. jihadists raided the facility looking for hostages. they had to launch an operation to free them because the kidnappers would not negotiate. >> a fluid situation that is ongoing, and very uncertain. i think we should be prepared for the possibility of further bad news, how difficult news in this difficult situation. >> it appears to have been well- planned. survivors say the kidnappers knew their way around, has reportedly strapped to explosives. the convoy of cars killed both militant stand islamists. >> when faced
with sadness and pain. i look at the eyes of the children of syria and do not see an innocent smile on their faces. i look at the hands of the elderly and i see them praying for their children, daughters, and grandchildren. safety and security are absent in these streets. many women lost their children, many children became orphans. siblings have been divided. this pain is spread over the country. from the pain, hope is born. from difficulty, solutions come. a dark cloud would hide the sun, but it would provide rain and cleanliness that would provide goodness for the country. syria will not come out of its impulse unless it changes this into a solution that will bring the country out of its impulse but it has never witnessed in the history of this region. this is the only way we can remedy all the injuries and deep wounds that we have in syria and the only way to keep syria more viable and bring it back socially, morally, and economically. everyone is responsible, however simple in his view. the country is ours. we defend it collectively. the situation is defense, and the preservati
that israeli jets for the first time had bombed a convoy of weapons heading from syria towards lebanon to support hezbollah. hezbollah has been expressing its concern in recent days and it sent its military intelligence chief to washington where he will express concern about chemical weapons from syria of going into the hands of hezbollah. on the nighttime news, they were taking satisfaction in the fact there had not been any verbal response from damascus or hezbollah. no physical response as well. syria came out with their own version of offense which was there was no convoy but they had bombed a scientific research center close to damascus and it used a rather interesting phrase, that it was used to support the resistance. that was the only thing they could agree on. it was something for hezbollah. what it was though, we are not sure. >> can you make any speculation about what kind of impact this might have? >> as you know, there has been tensions, missiles across the golan. israel has stepped up its borders, building its defense along the golan. both sides have warned each other tha
military has bombed a site inside of syria, near the palace of the president's regime in damascus. we're getting this from the israeli news agency, but according to reuters, an israeli jet attacked a syrian convoy as they were attempting to transport weapons back to hezbollah. the convoy was carrying antiaircraft and weapons. and he said this is israel's warning to the president and his regime that they will not tolerate any weapons for israel's destruction. if this happened, it's certainly an escalation. and there's some degree of confusion around this. >> it is, and before we talk about this at all, we have to remember, we're dealing with one government, the israelis, that never admit some of this action that they carry out and we're dealing with another government, the syrians, who habitually lie. we have to look at all of this. two reports, the first that this convoy, carrying amount i aircraft weapons, was struck near damascus to beirut highway, near the border, and that seems to be the most reliable sources talking about that particular attack. and then the syrian state tv has a
'll start with the king of jordan, abdullah ii. his nation sits in turmoil between syria, egypt, iraq and saudi arabia. despite some protests, jordan hasn't had its own arab spring. everyone was watching the parliamentary elections this week. will they satisfy protesters or inflame them? we'll get the king's reaction. then, the prime minister of r h russia dmitry medvedev. some call it a new cold war. who's to blame and will russia help in syria? we'll discuss it all. >>> also, the algerian hostage crisis that left dozens dead. is this a sign of a grave, new terror threat? i'll tell you my view. >>> but, first, here's my take. every year at davos people like me try to get a sense of the mood of the place. take the temperature of people in this frosty mountain resort. obviously, i will give you a highly impressionistic and personal picture, but one i find useful since davod does bring together leaders and government, business and media and even the ngo community from all corners of the world. it is genuinely global in a way that few conferences are. so, what is the mood? well, there's
"bbc world news america. the government in syria swaps prisoners for 49 iranians as the bbc said it is time for change that country. one family was forced to escape the flames in this fire. and need the nominations for the britons academy awards and -- and the nominations for the british academy awards are released and we have the films that made the cut. > >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and elsewhere around the globe. the syrian government has released 2000 prisoners, including women and children. the release was made in exchange for 49 iranians being held by rebels. it marked the first prisoner swap of its kind during the war. it comes as people continue to flee the country at a rapid rate. among them is one refugee, who says he was the only man to escape a firing squad near the city of aleppo. he has since fled to turkey. james reynolds has this report. >> muhammed olli works at a petrol station in southern turkey. customers barely notice him. but the man selling chris has one of the most astonishing -- selling crisps has one of the most astonishing
fractured nature of syria. >> right. how messy both within syria, because it's very unlikely there will be an effective government to replace assad's regime as they withdraw and also the enormous impact of refugees streaming across the border. over 500,000 already in jordan and turkey and iraq and north africa, as well as jihadists sa laughists causing violence in places like jordan and iraq. so, it's not only messy in terms of a continuing bleeding human rights problem on the ground in syria, irrespective if assad is still there at the end of 2013 or not, but also because we're going to see more sectarian violence metastasizing because of the outcomes from the syrian war. >> i think ian is absolutely right. if you look at the number of refugees, they are already starting to destabilize jordan, just in terms of inability to cope. in turkey, if syria splits into multiple regions, as i think certainly will happen for a while, you'll have a kurdish autonomous zone in syria that is going to create major trouble for turkey and lebanon is already being destabilized actively by supp
president biden. the magazine stands by its reporting. >>> now to syria where president assad addressed his nation in a rare speech just moments ago since the embattled president's last address in june, tens of thousands of syrians have been killed and even more have fled their homeland. more than 60,000 people have been killed across the country and the new year looks to be ushering in the same bloodshed and violence. mohammed jamjoon is watching things from beirut. if you can, break down what he had to say. >> good morning, randi. what we heard was a defiant reporting a lot of the same rhetoric that we heard from him when he's given speeches. rarely he has given them the last couple years but when he's given them or given interviews he disputed the notion that there was even a revolution going on in syria. he talked about how there was no fight in syria between the opposition and government forces, rather, it was between syria and its enemies. here's more of what he had to say specifically on that point. >> they are calling it a revolution. but it is not a revolution. revolutions need int
's not the only problem. iran has been flying arms to the al-assad regime and syria through the iraqi airspace. we've been trying to get the iraqis to insist the iranian planes land from inspection. they've only done to inspections and one was a plane returning empty from damascus. so it is a good question. and i think the answer is a complicated one, but i would say two things: one, in any country that is a newly emerging country, newly, you know, government, there is a sense of nationalism, that you have to contend with which is legitimate. the united states doesn't own iraq. they have their own government, their own leaders. we can't dictate to them what to do, and there are a lot of states in the region that are trying to meddle in iraq. the iranians big time, turkey, the gulf states are all trying to exert influence inside iraq. but also i think a big part of the answer is in really what happened to the united states. the american government is conflicted on iraq. the obama administration itself was ambivalent about whether we should keep forces in iraq beyond 2011 or not. in fact, president
. lebanon not only has a big board were israel, lebanon also has a big border with syria. and syria, of course, is embroiled in a raging and brutal civil war. look where the capital city of syria is relative to this map. look how close it is to lebanon and to israel, this ravaged capital city in this horrible ongoing war. and it is that geography that explains why there was an international gasp and shock today when this headline crossed, that israel had sent planes to bomb inside syria. or maybe it was on the border between syria and lebanon, depending on which headline you read and who they had asked for information on the ground. but if israel is sending bombers now deep into syria, or just over the border, does that mean this war inside syria, this two-year-old awful civil war has just gone international? specifically, has it become a war that involves israel too? and at least iranian interests, if not iran itself? did a much bigger war just start? joining us now from cairo is ayman mohyeldin. it's really nice of you to be here, especially staying up so late. what do we know abo
are fighting for control in syria. this video shows a nearby town with government jets bombing the area. another area in the north has been almost destroyed by government jets. the opposition members say it has been reduced by rebel -- rubble by army shelling. arab league foreign ministers are meeting in cairo to discuss the refugees in the area. tens of thousands of people have also fled to egypt. we have this report. >> two months ago, this man may be hardest decision of his life. he sold his car in damascus, that some clothes, and flew to cairo. he took his wife and daughter, but could not afford to take the rest of the family. >> i lost my factory. everything we had in syria, we lost. i am afraid of the regime and what is happening. >> mahomet is 20 years old. he left syria because tv -- muhammed is 20 years old. he left syria because he was afraid. the united nations estimates that more than 100,000 syrian refugees have fled to egypt since march 2011. 13,000 have registered, but the u.n. expects the number to triple by june. tens of thousands of syrian refugees live and work here.
. >> warner: with conflict raging inside syria, israel's taking no chances. it's now fortifying the security barrier behind me to guard against any dangers that may arise. >> ifill: and from mali, lindsay hilsum has a story of celebration as french and local forces push north to capture two key towns. >> reporter: look at these people. just thrilled because they can dance. they can sing. the women can ride motor bikes. they can do all the things they haven't been able to do for the last nine months while the jihadis have been in power. >> woodruff: we close with a new edition of the daily download. tonight, can your facebook postings get you fired? >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by moving our economfor 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connec us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corpor
. >> warner: with conflict raging inside syria israel's taking no chances. it's now fortifying the security barrier behind me to guard against any dangers that may arise. >> ifill: and from mali lindsay hilsum has a story of celebration as french and local forces push north to capture two key towns. >> reporter: look at these people. just thrilled because they can dance. they can sing. the women can ride motor bikes. they can do all the things they haven't been able to do for the last nine months while the jihadis have been in power. >> woodruff: we close with a new edition of the daily download. tonight, can your facebook postings get you fired? >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the cor
>> two bomb blast targeting the university in syria. the target was the university in aleppo. both sides are blaming each other for the attack. also making headlines this hour , hundreds more troops into mali as they battle the rebels. new york governor signs a law to prevent weapons getting into the wrong hands. uncertainty over whether lance armstrong confesses to doping in a television interview. in syria, two bomb blasts at a university has killed at least 80 people. dozens of others were wounded in that attack. opposition activists are blaming the government. >> the first day of school exams for many students at aleppo .niversity, and then guesthis what residents of syria's largest city described as to attacks on the campus. one was near campus accommodation where as many as 30,000 people live. many of them had moved there to escape violence and other areas of aleppo. some said the blast came from rocket attacks and planned opposition fighters. >> the cowardly terrorist act that targeted students at the university of aleppo. mr. president, we have always said that the terroris
turkey. >> one of the harrowing stories that do keep coming out of syria. today, our chief international correspondents sat down with the envoy from cairo. he had this to say about the need for change in the country. >> i think that what people are saying famine for 40 years is a bit prolonged period change house to be real -- the change house to be real. i think president assad has to respond to this aspiration of his people rather than resisting it. >> for more on that resistance, i spoke with the u.s. state department's formal -- former special advisor now out the atlantic council's career center for the middle east. thank you for coming in. believe me, they are trying to be diplomatic. it is time for assad to go, but is he making any push to go? >> i think is going to be very difficult for him to be -- to make progress in light of what president assad had to say a few days ago in the damascus opera house. i think that mr. beldini -- mr. bohimi at this point is placing an emphasis on getting support from americans and others. the transitional government of national unity, so to speak,
-- the first german dutch troops arrive in turkey as part of the defense of turkey's border with syria. europe's shrinking workforce. unemployment in the eurozone reaches an all-time high of 20 million people, who are looking for a job. >> after a decade of reclusive is, musician david bowie releases a new single remembering his days in berlin. german troops have arrived in turkey to take part in the nato deployment of patriot missiles on the border with syria. turkey is a member of the nato military alliance and asked its partners for help, saying it is concerned about further deadly rocket attacks from syrian territory. >> dutch and u.s. troops will also be taking part in the mission, which nato says is a purely defensive measure. critics say it is likely to raise tensions in the region already on the edge. iranian and u.s. forces facing off in the strait of hormuz and with the war in syria and dragging on. >> a plane carrying german and dutch troops touched down in turkey as their right to prepare the deployment of nato patriot missiles. earlier, the missile batteries were loaded onto ships
rights has told aljazeera the situation in syria has deteriorated. she says crimes resulting from violence should be investigated. the united nations, a report. >> in southern syria, a residential neighborhood which is now a war zone, where the bombardment continues around the clock. people run for cover, but there is nowhere safe. incidences like this one are war crimes, according to these. these current members of the security council are among 58 nations that have signed a petition, demanding that syria and all sides in the conflict be referred to the international criminal court. in the face of such a dramatic death toll and the silence of the security council, we thought we must speak out on the absolute need for accountability and to send a clear message that the international community is not turning a blind eye to the atrocities being committed in syria. >> the situation in syria has been repeatedly discussed around this, the security council table. in 2011, 2012, and now in 2013. all the time, the death toll continues to rise. it is now above anyone's worst fears. yet, be
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